Center for Creative Energy


Filtration Ponds a big hit in Drought Cities by Joe Navarro

San Diego, California and San Angelo, Texas are alike in certain ways.  For example, the San Diego Safari Park has filtration ponds just like the ones we have behind the Museum of Fine Arts.  Filtration ponds uses plants to absorb bacteria and nutrients out of the water.  When bacteria and nutrinets are left in the water, algae grows taking oxygen from the water. When the algae dies, the decomposers eat it and then reproduce.  They take even more oxygen from the water until finally water creatures start dying.  Grants funded the building of the filtration ponds at the Safari Park.  These ponds helped move water creatures around the pond system.  The water got cleaner by using the filtration ponds.  The old system sent the water to the top of a hill and as it slid down the bacteria and nutrients got trapped in the ground plants.   Way to go San Diego for improving your water quality!  They also have two mini reserviors where the water is saved just like our three reserviors; Twin Buttes, O.C. Fisher, and Lake Nasworthy.  Creatures live in and around the reserviors year around such as pelicans and deer.  The city of San Diego has the San Diego River running through it just like San Angelo has the Concho River running through it.  They’re even going through a drought, like us, and they have to conserve their precious natural

This filtration pond helps to keep the water clean from bacteria and nutrients.

resource…water.  For more information on how to conserve water tune in for more Aqua Squad updates.

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ZOO in One!

That means 2 in one at the San Diego Zoo because saving species also means saving their habitats. WATER is in every habitat.

This is John, Henry, and Andreas and were going to let you know what we experienced at the San Diego Zoo.

After leaving the Museum of Photographic Arts we headed to the  San Diego Zoo where we met Judi who told us a little about the Zoo and took us to our private tour with Wendy. Wendy took us to look at all the animals and even let us feed the camels.  One big highlight of the day was meeting Doug Myers, Director of the San Diego Zoo. We were struck by how much he cared about not just the zoo but also the environment. It was cool to find out how much we had in common.

We saw pandas! Zoo staff think that Yanzi may be pregnant!

This is a picture of an awesome a polar bear that we saw on our private tour. This photo was taken by Andreas.

We had a great time, learned a lot, and even got to share our water conservation ideas with a goofy zebra named Robert. Check it out!


Apply for Aqua Squad!

Are you a student in the San Angelo Independent School District and going into 7th or 8th grade next year (2012-2013 school year)?

Have you heard a lot about water issues in San Angelo lately?

Are you creative? Do you love to help?

Then you should apply for Aqua Squad!

Download the application to get started: AquaSquadApplication2012

Selected students will travel to San Diego to learn about photography and H20 issues. Your final challenge is to create a photography exhibit about water in San Angelo and beyond!

Below are some of the fun things Aqua Squad did last year. Join the fun–and become part of the solution to our water problems! To find out more, follow this link: https://artmuseumscience.wordpress.com/aqua-squad/

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Lessons About Water

San Angelo had a crazy snow/ice storm last week, so Art/Science Fusion readjusted scheduling to make sure that SAISD 2nd graders still get the most from the program. Christy and I (Meg) shared a couple of sessions, and it got me thinking about how important water is to this program.

One of our major themes and goals for the Center of Creative Energy is to connect the curriculum to water. For the All About Texas Art/Science Fusion curriculum we use water in a couple of ways:

Laying down washes of color.

1. We’re using watercolor. Okay, a bit literal, I know…BUT Walt Davis, who is featured in the All About Texas exhibition at SAMFA, created beautiful watercolor paintings to document the journey he and his wife took around the edges of Texas. Our 2nd graders are learning some basic techniques like masking, washing, and dry brushing to create watercolor postcards of the Texas landscape. At the end of the program, the kids will exchange their postcards along with a letter sharing their thoughts about their time at the Museum and Water Education Center.

Christy and students organizing Texas wildlife according to region.

2. We’re focusing on how water (in the form of rivers and an ocean basin) helps create the shape of Texas. This naturally leads to a great discussion about how ecologically diverse Texas is. Texas has 7 ecologically unique regions featuring deserts, swamps, canyons, prairies, and beaches.

Why does Texas have such an awesome terrain? Because different amounts and kinds of water (salt vs. fresh) can create different ecosystems and landforms. Of course, Texas being really, really big helps a lot!

As we continue to teach this program, we hope that students are starting to think about the important role both water and art play in their lives.

If you have a moment with your students, ask them why water is important. Then, feel free to share those responses in the comment section below.

Thanks, everyone!

–Meg



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